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Forty years of innovation in ventilation

The polio outbreak in the 1950s and the beginning of modern Ventilation Therapy

 

"Getinge buys Siemens Life Support Systems"

Forty years of innovation in ventilation

The polio outbreak in the 1950s and the beginning of modern Ventilation Therapy

Ventilation after the epidemic – The first mechanical respirators

The Servo

The Servo revolution
 

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AlterEgo & Partners™

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Forty years of innovation in ventilation (continua)

   

 

                           

 

The polio outbreak in the 1950s and the beginning of modern Ventilation Therapy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the early Fifties, the last great polio outbreak spread from North America to Europe.

 

Scandinavia was particularly affected by the epidemic, with more than 2.900 patients succumbing to the disease in Copenhagen alone from July to December, 1952.

At that time,
mechanical ventilation was not yet available to treat the victims, who quickly succumbed to the disease as a result of respiratory paralysis.

 

Production of copious amounts of thick phlegm and saliva led to patients becoming cyanotic because of oxygenation failure.

 

The final stages of the disease were characterized by high temperature, high blood pressure and a high level of CO2 in the plasma.
 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Iron lungs were considered the most advanced technology of the period, but still proved ineffective against polio.

 

 

Many patients were treated in cylindrical iron lungs, which encased the patient from neck to foot.

 

The iron lungs worked by applying and releasing negative pressure so that the patient’s chest wall expanded during inspiration and passively contracted during expiration.

 

But even the iron lungs, the most advanced technology available at that time, could not save patients, and the high mortality rates continued.